Kitchen Tips

In season with Food magazine: cherries

One of summer’s delights, who can resist the temptation of this plump and juicy fruit?

By Sophie Gray

Need to know:

  • Cherries have been around for a long time; archaeologists have discovered fossilised cherry pits in prehistoric caves throughout Europe and Asia.
  • As well as tasting great, cherries are good for your health – they're high in antioxidants, fibre, potassium and vitamin A, C and K.
  • They also contain antioxidants called anthocyanins, the source of their vivid colour. These pigments are a type of phytonutrient known as flavonoids, which have been linked to a variety of health benefits — from potential protection against heart disease and cancer to keeping the brain sharp.
  • Research indicates that cherries help inhibit enzymes in the body that are associated with inflammation. The compounds in cherries responsible for this have a similar activity as aspirin and ibuprofen and can bring relief to sufferers of joint pain.
  • Additionally, cherries are one of the few food sources of melatonin, a potent antioxidant that helps improve the body's circadian rhythms and natural sleep patterns, so they can help you sleep easy.

Try these cherry-inspired recipes from the Food Jan/Feb 2019 issue:

Pop one of these little treats in your mouth and we guarantee you'll be hooked. The combination of cherry and chocolate just divine in these mini cheesecakes, and their size makes them even more fun!
This recipe puts a new spin on the classic pavlova, and it works like a dream! The cherry topping and coffee cream match deliciously with the chocolate meringue base - making an irresistible dessert.
There's only one thing better than a warm scone, and that's a warm scone slathered in homemade jam! Try these tasty chocolate chip buttermilk scones with our exquisite cherry jam.
For more delicious ways to use cherries in your cooking, click here!
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