Kitchen Tips

These storage tricks will help your fresh fruit and veg last longer

Try these simple storage tips that will help you get the most from your fresh produce. Not only will reducing your food waste help you save money, you'll be helping the planet as you go!

By Erin Fisher
Cutting open an avocado to reveal the most perfect green flesh inside is one of life's simple pleasures. Heading to the fridge a day later only to find your glorious avocado remains have turned a muddy brown colour – not so much.
So to help you maximise the life of your produce, we have rounded up some of the best food-storing hacks.
  • Any fruits or vegetables that spoil quickly or wilt such as leafy greens, cucumber, broccoli, berries or grapes, should be kept in the fridge.
  • If you have greens like celery and broccoli that you don't plan on eating for a while, wrap them in foil to keep them crisp. To prevent leafy greens from wilting too fast, wrap them in paper towels to absorb any excess moisture.
  • Store asparagus like you would do with flowers; bases trimmed and standing upright in a jar with a little bit of water.
  • Citrus fruits, tomatoes and bananas should be kept on the bench (unless you prefer to eat your citrus cold!) and all your starchy vegetables like pumpkins and potatoes are best in the pantry or a cool, dry spot.
  • For any fruit that you prefer to keep in the fridge – perhaps apples, pears or oranges – make sure to keep them away from your veggies, as they can speed up their ripening process.
Image: CathMuscat / bauersyndication.com.au
  • Avocados and pears can be kept on the bench. To speed up ripening, store in a brown paper bag with a banana. To slow down ripening, transfer them to the fridge.
  • In your pantry, keep potatoes and onions away from each other as the ethylene gas emitted by the onions will cause your potatoes to sprout rapidly. Apples and potatoes however, are great friends – storing them together will prevent the potatoes from sprouting.
  • Cut the green tops off vegetables like carrots, beets and parsnips before you put them in the fridge. These tops absorb moisture and are what causes carrots to go limp and bendy!
  • For long-lasting carrots, store them in the fridge, submerged in water in a closed jar or container.
  • Transfer any dry foods like pasta, crackers and grains from their original packaging to an airtight container straight away to prevent them from going stale.
  • Instead of using a tablespoon of tomato paste and throwing out the rest, store the remaining paste in an ice cube tray – perfect for single serves!
  • With nuts and nut butters, the best storage depends on how quickly you eat them. If you will eat your supply within a couple of weeks, it's fine to store them in an airtight container in the pantry. If it will take you much longer, then pop them in the fridge so they don't go rancid. Ground nuts and seeds should always be kept refrigerated as they are prone to oxidation.
  • Any time you have half an avocado, drizzle it with lemon juice, store in a container next to a chunk of onion, or refrigerate on a plate flesh-side down. Lemon juice can also be added to guacamole.